My favourite wildflower reserves

Here is a list and brief description of bushland reserves I have either worked in or have visited recreationally.

 

1. Kings park

Kings park located near the city is a show of wildflowers from around western Australia. From the Kimberly to Albany and the inner deserts this park allows people the pleasure of seeing wildflowers from around the state. And the endangered species In those regions.

 

2. John forrest NP

John Forrest Np is a very large reserve of good quality jarrah forest located in Mundaring just on the Great Eastern Highway. Featuring several walk trails for  varying fitness levels, including A historic railway walk, a six hour trek and last but not least a scenic wildflower walk.

 

3.  Ellis brook reserve

Otherwise known as sixty foot falls, Ellis brook reserve is also located in the Perth hills. Here jarrah intersects with wandoo and salmon gum. Around the waterfall it becomes wet enough to allow native ferns to grow in the granite crevices

 

4. Wireless hill reserve

Wireless hill is a large reserve located in the middle of suburban Ardross. Featuring plenty of orchids and other wildflowers close to the very well made tracks, perfect for photo opportunities. The reserve is maintained by the very passionate Friends of Wireless Hill. So why don’t you go and help them out, enjoy wildflowers and make friends at the same time.

 

5. Lesmurdie falls

Very similar to Ellis brook reserve, with wandoo trees and featuring a waterfall. Lesmurdie falls also has a nice display of low shrub flowers on the higher ridges.

 

6. Mary street 212

Mary street 212 isn’t the actual name of the reserve in fact I don’t think it has any official name. mary street is an out of the way, not very prominent wildflower reserve located in Wanneroo . A small reserve it is actually in extremely good condition and is an excellent place for wildflower photography.

 

7. Kensington bushland

Kensington bushland located within walking distance of the West Australian Herbarium is an example of Banksia woodland on Perth’s Bassendean soils. Here you will see abundant stands of Banksia and a thick shrub layer.

 

8. Shenton park

Formerly used as a rubbish tip, Shenton park bushland  is a very nice patch of remnant bushland located a few kilometres from the coast. In addition to the untouched bush areas, extensive revegetation works have been made to rehabilitate the bushland area.

 

You should also check out the wildflower reserve lists on the wildflower society website for maps and more information.

–          Mathew Woods

The Buzz on Native Bees

Thousands of species of native bees all around the world are our most important pollinators of flowers, though rarely seen. Faye Arcaro will delve into the secret lives of these tiny, solitary workers and show how to create a bee hotel so you can welcome them in to your own space.

Faye Arcaro aka Botanic Obsession is host of “Let’s Talk Gardening” on Curtin Radio, 8-10am Saturdays, which combines her love of gardening and talking about gardening. Faye won ABC Gardener of the Year in 2007 and just loves being in her garden and bush on acreage in Jandakot. Later this year, Faye starts training as a botanic guide for Botanica Travel and another first will be to take her talks to the high seas as a speaker on a cruise to New Zealand.

Join us for what is sure to be an interesting and charisimatic night, all welcome! Supper included. See who of your Facebook Friends is coming here.

Meet 2017 Team of Murdoch Branch

The last AGM at Murdoch Branch resulted in the election of a new group of enthusiastic Murdoch Branch Committee Members. With a few changes along the way our current committee is: President: Christine Allen, Vice-President: Diana Corbyn, Secretary: Sheree Walter, Treasurer: Mathew Woods, General Committee Members: Felicity Bairstow, Gus King, Ross Young, and Eddy Wajon. Let’s introduce you to the team:

Dr Christine Allen has been a life-long plant-lover and spent her childhood exploring the second-oldest National Park in the world, the Royal National Park in NSW. The weird and wonderful diversity of plants in the southwest of WA drew her to Perth where she completed a PhD at UWA with DPaW on threatened flora in the Stirling Range National Park. Christine is now an active advocate for conservation and sustainability. Favourite plant: Banksia coccinea.

Diana Corbyn has served as Branch President through three terms, has been a Vice President and a committee member throughout the life of the branch. Since she became a lecturer at South Metropolitan TAFE’s Murdoch Campus in 1991 she continually enthuses her love and knowledge of the local flora in hearts and minds of the students she teaches. In 1998 she initiated the wildflower walks and has continued to this day. Come on out this year and meet Diana at Wireless Hill, Orelia or Samson Park.

Sheree Walters joined Murdoch committee for the first time, few weeks after our AGM (Welcome!), and she took bravely on a responsible role of secretary. Sheree grew up in the wheatbelt region of Western Australia with a passion for the environment and natural landscapes. After completing a Bachelor degree in Environmental Science in 2014, Sheree has recently returned to Curtin University to undertake a PhD in restoration genetics of native flora. She is particularly interested in landscape ecology and the importance of biodiversity – including plants, animals, insects and fungi – in both natural and restored landscapes.

Mathew Woods is our fantastic treasurer. Mat works in the Bushland’s and Wetland’s of Perth. Mat has a Love of all plant life but especially WA natives. He is particularly fascinated by the food plants and prehistoric flora. He was exposed to the native plants very early while camping in the Jarrah forest and surrounding regions and could not get enough. This fascination led him to study Conservation and Land Management at the Challenger Institute of Technology. In his spare time Mat enjoys practicing traditional bushman skills.

Felicity Bairstow (ex McGeorge) calls herself a life long nature nerd from country WA. She has spent the last 20 or so years working to conserve bushland and wetlands south of the Swan river here in Perth. A lot of that time went into the long campaign to protect the North Lake Reserve from Roe Highway Stage 8. She is now a co-convenor of the Community Wildlife Corridor group which has the vision of transforming the now partially cleared road reserve into a wildlife corridor and trail for people to enjoy and learn about the amazing plants, animals and culture of this area. Felicity served on the Murdoch committee many years ago and is very pleased to be back on Committee and dealing with much more pleasant aspects of plant conservation.

Ross Young is fresh out of uni, having graduated from Curtin University in 2014 with a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Biology. Don’t let that fool you, though – he’s longer in the tooth than you think, as uni followed a 27-year jaunt with Commonwealth Bank (and an accounting degree). Ross has a keen interest in plant ecology (and birds) and Western Australian plants (and birds), in particular – and has always been interested in the natural world around him. As a kid, he learnt (from his Mum) the pleasure to be had from being able to recognise (and name) the plants (and birds) in the garden (which, even then, included native plants). Banksias are probably his favourite plants (especially Banksia coccinea and Banksia ilicifolia) but, if pressed, he’ll still admit to a lingering fondness for roses.

Dr Eddy Wajon loves nature – whether it be chemical, botanical or zoological, he loves beauty in all its forms. He’s been called a disrupter – challenging the status quo, thinking outside the box, trying to be different, and generally annoying those in power and supposed leadership positions. However, he tries to be creative, inclusive, contributory and a force for positive change.

Angus (Gus) King, like Eddy, loves the beauty and magic of nature, especially our native trees. Other than recognising their beauty and threatened status he knows little about native plants but can still actively contribute to preserving them for future generations. He originally studied geology but more by accident than design had a career in IT. His real passion is renewable energy and even though retired he probably still spends too much time on his computer helping to bring about its adoption rather than learning those plant names.

Come and say Hi!

LIKE US and See more updates on our MURDOCH BRANCH FACEBOOK PAGE.

Murdoch Branches Out – 2016 Excursion to York WA.

The Murdoch Branch of WSWA held its annual two-day field trip on 13-14 August 2016.

The excursion was  organized by Ben Sims  – Vice-President of Murdoch Mob. On the first day the group visited several roadside reserves including Wambyn Nature Reserve and St Ronan’s Reserve. A great diversity of plants was recorded, including several species of fairy orchids (Caladenia spp.), Mirbelias (Mirbelia floribunda on a photo above), Hakeas, sundews (Drosera spp.) and acacias, to name a few.

Wambyn Nature Reserve.
Wambyn Nature Reserve.

Continue reading “Murdoch Branches Out – 2016 Excursion to York WA.”

Be Awarded, Be Connected – Student Prize Winners.

The student prizes are one of many ways we as a society try to bridge the inter-generational gap. And the older folks have a lot to share, believe me!

Perth Branch is supporting UWA students; Northern Branch is looking at ECU while Murdoch Branch is obviously looking for the best students around its own bush that is Murdoch University and TAFE Challenger.

Last two years Murdoch Branch had a great honour to award four outstanding people. Pawel – our (tall) president of the last two years (2015-2016) is very happy to hand over the awards to:

1.     Merryn – the best student in “Plant Diversity”  in 2015:

From Left: Secretary Christina Birnbaum, The Winner Merryn Prior, President Pawel Waryszak.
From Left: Secretary Christina Birnbaum, The Winner Merryn Prior, President Pawel Waryszak.

Continue reading “Be Awarded, Be Connected – Student Prize Winners.”

Chin Up Clean Up :) A Truly Australian Day

The Wildflower Society of Western Australia Inc. (WSWA) was established in 1958 to promote the value of our natural bushland. The Society does this through regular meetings and excursions, native plant sales, bushland plant surveys, book sales, donations, and attendance at relevant events and much more …

Murdoch Branch introduced an additional function to numerous tasks our vibrant community has committed to. We have embarked on cleaning up the Roe 8 Reserve. As part of the national Clean Up Australia Day, on Sunday March 6, 2016, The Murdoch Branch of the Wildflower Society joined forces with Cockburn Council, Rethink the Link Alliance, and the Save Beeliar Wetlands community to clean up the beautiful remnant bushland that is standing proud against the ill-conceived idea of pushing a highway through to soon-out-of-capacity Fremantle Port.

It was the 27th celebration of Clean Up Australia Day an idea initiated by Ian Kiernan that in 1993 gained the support of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) that turned into Clean Up the World Day.

The event went far beyond what participants expected as community neighbours jumped out on the street to offer a helping hand and served chilled drinks in the heat to the hardworking volunteers.

CommunityDrink3_web

More than fifty members had shown their interest on Facebook to take part in the event. Fifteen people gathered on the ground to clean up the Roe 8 bushland. The youngest, aged 5 and 7, received Certificates of Participation as recognition by Clean Up Australia, as they did persevere till the end of the event with enthusiasm.

Finley receives a Clean Up Australia Certificate
Finley receives a Clean Up Australia Certificate

Pawel Waryszak, Wildflower Society of WA Murdoch Branch President and the Event Convener, explained what Clean Up Australia Day meant to him: “Clean-Up Australia creates a great community feel. Today I met so many of my neighbours who I would normally not have a chance to talk to”.

Local residents assists in disposing the rubbish.
Local residents assists in disposing the rubbish.

I definitely underestimated the scale of littering in our local bushland. We managed to cover only a quarter of what we planned to do in the two hours allocated to the clean-up”, Pawel concluded.

Bags_web

One of the volunteers, Robin Scott, student at Murdoch University and environmentalist, added enthusiastically: “I came along as I know that dumping off rubbish is a big issue when it comes to the management of bushland in Perth. Clean Up Australia Day lived up to my expectations as I was expecting there to be a lot of rubbish involved”.

Nicole Carey, PhD Candidate in Wetlands Conservation at Murdoch University, who also came to give us a hand said: “I liked that it was an easy way to care for the local environment, while contributing to a national event. A truly fun, social morning”.

Clean Up Australia Day 2016

Pawel calls for a bigger turnout next year with more community involvement that is much needed in order to conserve our beloved bushland.

Author: @PWaryszak

Meet Murdoch Managerial Mob

The AGM in December 2015 resulted in the election of a new group of enthusiastic Murdoch Branch Committee Members: Vice-President: Ben Sims, Secretary: Christine Allen, Treasurer: Mathew Woods, General Committee Members: Christina Birnbaum, Eddy Wajon, Diana Corbyn, Gus King, Neil Goldsborough, Ross Young, and Pawel Waryszak accepted the honour of being re-elected for the second time as Branch President. Let me introduce you to the team:

  1. Pawel Waryszak loves exploring the natural world. In 2012 he came to Perth where he commenced his PhD project at Murdoch University. Pawel’s PhD project looks at the role of the topsoil seed bank transfer in Banksia woodland restoration and he is at the stage of writing up the results now. Pawel is very grateful to Dr Phil Ladd for introducing him to the folks at Wildflower Society of WA who share his passion for wildflowers. He has always enjoyed learning about the plants that grow around him – by the time he was a teenager, he had already spent a big chunk of his pocket money on flora guides of the region he was born in (that is, in the Lublin region of Poland).
  2. Ben Sims grew up in Tasmania and had a love for nature and gardening from a young age. After finishing his Bachelor of Agricultural Science he travelled around Australia and moved to Perth in 2009. After many years travelling he decided to take his career more seriously and in 2012 started with Natural Area as an Environmental Field officer. He nearly instantly gained a passion for WA wildflowers and studied a Diploma of Conservation Land Management and joined the Wildflower Society to learn as much as he possibly could. A few years later he decided he wanted to combine his passions of gardening and nature to create environmentally friendly landscapes and promote the use of endemic and Australian species.
  3. Dr Christine Allen has been a life-long plant-lover and spent her childhood exploring the second-oldest National Park in the world, the Royal National Park in NSW. The weird and wonderful diversity of plants in the southwest of WA drew her to Perth where she completed a PhD at UWA with DPaW on threatened flora in the Stirling Range National Park. Christine is now an active advocate for conservation and sustainability. Favourite plant: Banksia coccinea.
  4. Mathew Woods works in the Bushland’s and Wetland’s of Perth. Mat has a Love of all plant life but especially WA natives. He is particularly fascinated by the food plants and prehistoric flora. He was exposed to the native plants very early while camping in the Jarrah forest and surrounding regions and could not get enough. This fascination led him to study Conservation and Land Management at the Challenger Institute of Technology. In his spare time Mat enjoys practicing traditional bushman skills.
  5. Dr Christina Birnbaum is a plant ecologist interested in a wide range of topics related to plants, including their biology and interactions with belowground micro-organisms in native and novel environments. She moved to Western Australia from Sydney, where she did her PhD on invasive Australian acacias, in 2012 and since then has been fascinated by the unique and beautiful WA flora.
  6. Diana Corbyn has served as Branch President through three terms, has been a Vice President and a committee member throughout the life of the branch. Since she became a lecturer at Challenger TAFE’s Murdoch Campus in 1991 she continually enthuses her love and knowledge of the local flora in hearts and minds of the students she teaches. In 1998 she initiated the wildflower walks and has continued to this day. Come on out this year and meet Diana at Wireless Hill, Orelia or Samson Park.
  7. Dr Eddy Wajon loves nature – whether it be chemical, botanical or zoological, he loves beauty in all its forms. He’s been called a disrupter – challenging the status quo, thinking outside the box, trying to be different, and generally annoying those in power and supposed leadership positions. However, he tries to be creative, inclusive, contributory and a force for positive change.
  8. Angus (Gus) King, like Eddy, loves the beauty and magic of nature, especially our native trees. Other than recognising their beauty and threatened status he knows little about native plants but can still actively contribute to preserving them for future generations. He originally studied geology but more by accident than design had a career in IT. His real passion is renewable energy and even though retired he probably still spends too much time on his computer helping to bring about its adoption rather than learning those plant names
  9. Neil Goldsborough is an Environmental Scientist in Environmental Restoration. Coordinator for the Friends of North Lake & an avid leader for wildflower walks. Demonstrator at Murdoch University for Introduction to Environmental Science since 2004. Has taught at Challenge TAFE (now Institute of Technology) and was an instructor for Rossmoyne Senior High School Bush Rangers. He served as Branch President for 3 years & has been on the committee since joining in 1996.
  10. Ross Young is fresh out of uni, having graduated from Curtin University in 2014 with a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Biology. Don’t let that fool you, though – he’s longer in the tooth than you think, as uni followed a 27-year jaunt with Commonwealth Bank (and an accounting degree). Ross has a keen interest in plant ecology (and birds) and Western Australian plants (and birds), in particular – and has always been interested in the natural world around him. As a kid, he learnt (from his Mum) the pleasure to be had from being able to recognise (and name) the plants (and birds) in the garden (which, even then, included native plants). Banksias are probably his favourite plants (especially Banksia coccinea and Banksia ilicifolia) but, if pressed, he’ll still admit to a lingering fondness for roses.

Come and say Hi. See more updates on our  MURDOCH BRANCH FACEBOOK PAGE.