We’re on Gardening Australia

Josh Byrne visits the Helen and Aurora Range with WA Wildflower Society member Brian Moyle, who has spent many years working to protect this rare banded-ironstone landscape and its Gimlet gum (Eucalyptus salubris) woodland.  It is currently within a conservation park, but the Society is hoping to have it changed to a National Park due to its National Heritage values.  The view from the summit is breathtaking.

The hard, hot rock formations result in temperature extremes, ranging from 50 degrees to freezing.  The area has produced many species that occur nowhere else in the world, such as the Bungalbin tetratheca (Tetratheca aphylla), which produces masses of purple flowers in spring and grows in tiny cracks in the rock.  We also see the ironstone beard-heath (Leucopogon spectabilis), which has white flowers and seemingly grows straight out of the rock!

Link to video here:  http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/factsheets/remote-ranges/10343146

Blooming Biodiversity Video

Here is a tone poem of visual images of Albany and the South West – just to get you in the mood for the ANPSA National Conference in 2019.  We’ll be adding in more flower footage as the season progresses, so that it is representative of the scenery at that time of year.  Link here.  Enjoy!

Thank you, Minister Dawson

Our heartfelt thanks to WA Environment Minister Stephen Dawson, who has announced the final outright rejection of mining of the Helena Aurora Range and the intention to create a Helena Aurora Range national park.

We invite our members to personally thank Minister Dawson, and to look at the proposal for a national park prepared by the Wildflower Society, the Wilderness Society, and the Helena and Aurora Advocates.

Download the Helena and Aurora National Park Proposal here (3mb).

Bush Heritage says ‘thanks’

Wonderful blog from Bush Heritage thanking the Wildflower Society for conducting flora surveys at Hamelin Station and Eurardy Station. We had a lot of fun doing the work… and it is our pleasure. And how nice to receive public recognition.

‘We now have over 50 Threatened, Priority and/or endemic plant species on the list for Eurardy Reserve – amazing! Our most recent purchase in the Mid-west – Hamelin Station Reserve – is located next to the Shark Bay World Heritage Area and had never been surveyed in detail for flora.’ -Vanessa Westcott, Bush Heritage Ecologist

Read the blog here: https://www.bushheritage.org.au/blog/the-wonderful-wildflower-society-of-wa

Photo courtesy Bush Heritage

Helena and Aurora Range National Park Proposal

Many groups (including the Wildflower Society) and individuals involved in the Helena and Aurora Range (Bungalbin) campaign have been very pro active over the last few months to show that there is strong public support for protecting the Range in its entirety. This is important to encourage and support our WA government to say no to mining the Range.

There is every indication that the WA government will make a final decision on whether to allow mining or not within the next couple of weeks (before Christmas). Otherwise the decision will not be made until later in the New Year. The decision will be made by Minister Stephen Dawson, however, he also needs to have the support of other key Ministers in Cabinet as the final decision also considers social and economic factors in addition to environmental. Cabinet meet for the last time this year this Monday on 11 December 2017.

Download the Helena and Aurora National Park Proposal here (3mb).

Helena and Aurora Range National Park Proposal

Many groups (including the Wildflower Society) and individuals involved in the Helena and Aurora Range (Bungalbin) campaign have been very pro active over the last few months to show that there is strong public support for protecting the Range in its entirety. This is important to encourage and support our WA government to say no to mining the Range.

There is every indication that the WA government will make a final decision on whether to allow mining or not within the next couple of weeks (before Christmas). Otherwise the decision will not be made until later in the New Year. The decision will be made by Minister Stephen Dawson, however, he also needs to have the support of other key Ministers in Cabinet as the final decision also considers social and economic factors in addition to environmental. Cabinet meet for the last time this year this Monday on 11 December 2017.

Download the Helena and Aurora National Park Proposal here (3mb).

Come and Learn about WA Native Community

DPaW invites you to attend the Banksia Woodland Management Workshop on Friday 16th June 2017 from 10am – 4.30pm at the McNamara Conservation Science Centre, Department of Parks and Wildlife (17 Dick Perry Avenue, Kensington, WA). SEE VENUE CHANGE BELOW

Department of Parks and Wildlife is planning a packed program with 21 speakers giving 5, 15 and 20-minute talks for community and professional land managers of Banksia woodland. One of the speakers is the patron of Murdoch Branch Dr Joe Fontaine. Joe will also talk on outcomes of PhD project undertaken by one of his student Pawel Waryszak. Pawel and Joe spent 4 years surveying and analysing the outcomes of multiple experimental treatments in the restoration project that utilized  topsoil salvaged from under cleared Banksia woodland at the Jandakot Airport. The topsoil, that contains large native seed bank, was transferred to two restoration sites, at Anketell Road and Forrestdale Lake, with aim to rehabilitate degraded paddock. Come, learn and show your support for this unique WA ecological community.

The workshop is planned to start with an overview of Banksia woodlands on the Swan Coastal Plain and more details about its very recent federal listing as a threatened ecological community. Parks and Wildlife staff will then share outcomes from five years of the Banksia Woodland Restoration Project, as well as research on fire recovery and weed management. To follow, sessions will showcase studies from respected academics and researchers on the topics of dieback, groundwater, genetics, fire, and fauna, and feature case studies of Banksia woodland management from local government and community perspectives. An opportunity for informal discussion will follow. The workshop is a free event with lunch, afternoon tea and refreshments provided but registration is critical.

On Tuesday 20th June 2017 (10am – 12 noon),  Parks and Wildlife staff offers also a guided tour to Banksia woodland restoration site at Anketell Road in Oakford (self-drive).

To register, contact Julia Cullity at Julia.Cullity@dpaw.wa.gov.au or on 9442 0320 (please indicate whether you will be attending the workshop, field trip or both). Registrations close Friday 2nd June 2017.

STOP PRESS:  CHANGE OF VENUE AS AT 29 MAY 2017

Due to a huge response of interest, we have changed the venue of the Banksia Woodland Management Workshop.

  • Banksia Woodland Management Workshop
  • The University Club of Western Australia, UWA
  • 9.45–4.30pm Friday 16 June 2017

Parking may be limited. Additional free parking at Parks and Wildlife Crawley office is available 1km from the venue. Please see reception for a parking permit.

Please confirm that you can make this change of venue. And if you haven’t already responded, please let me know if you have any special dietary requirements and if you would like to attend the post-conference field trip on Tuesday 20 June 2017.

Cheers

Julia Cullity

Community Bushland Coordinator

P: 9442 0320| M: 0400 017 977| E: julia.cullity@dpaw.wa.gov.au

Ridge Walk the Helena & Aurora Range

The Wildflower Society has been campaigning for over ten years to protect the Helena and Aurora Range, which is home to five endemic plant species and eleven priority plant species, as well as four species of threatened fauna. The Society has joined a coalition of environment groups calling for the creation of a national park in the area.  Take a virtual ridge walk of the Helena and Aurora range – link on our Campaigns page here.

Connecting with Nature in the City (Letter from Dawn)

Dear WSWA members,

There’s something special about watching the sun rise from Kings Park… when the surface of the river is like glass, the sky has a rosy tinge, and there’s a bit of chill in the air. The city emerges from the gloom and the trees along Fraser Avenue turn gold. Some parrots erupt from the canopy in a sudden assault of sound, and then the mournful call of a raven and some warbling magpies. And the flowers… the flowers in spring! All that colour and variety and beauty that words just can’t convey…

Kings Park has to be my favourite green space in Perth.  But you probably have your own favourite – it might be a park, or some remnant bushland, even a backyard. These spaces will also be special to you for very individual reasons. It is something I’ve been exploring for my PhD as well as how important intangible things (like beauty or solitude or relaxation) are to people’s experiences of urban green space. I’m interested because I want to know if green spaces in a city like Perth are enough for users to feel connected with nature.

The American ecologist, Robert M. Pyle came up with the rather gloomy term, ‘extinction of experience’ which he used to describe an ever-diminishing connection between humans and common species of plants and animals in an everyday environment, especially in the developed world. He warned that “those who know and recognise less, care less, and therefore act less, leading to still more losses”.[1]  So if people in cities can connect with nature in urban green spaces that would probably be a good thing!

If you’d like to hear more about connecting with nature in the city, I’ll be talking about my PhD research at the Murdoch branch on 2 March 2017 so please come along. You can also help me with my research! I’m collecting information at the moment in an online survey to see how Perth residents use and experience urban green space. It only takes about 15 minutes to complete and can be accessed here: http://tinyurl.com/GREENspacePerthSurvey Please share this link with your Perth friends too as every little bit of information helps.

Thanks and hope to see you soon!

Dawn Dickinson

(dawn.dickinson@research.uwa.edu.au)


Reference:
[1] Pyle, R. M. (2003). “Nature matrix: reconnecting people and nature.” Oryx 37:209.